News

PARK(ing) Day 2020

Wellington PARK(ing) Day 2020

On Friday 6 March, twenty two Cuba Street car parks were occupied by creatives, architects, urban designers and community groups, proposing alternative ways we might use our public space. Congratulations to judges' choice winners Bernie Harfleet and Donna Turtle Sarten for their project Max and Bella and friends (detail), an enigmatic reflection on mental illness. Congratulations also to Judah Jackson who won the people's choice award for his car park Put yourself in others' shoes.

Thank you to Wellington City Council and Wellington Community Trust for supporting the event. 

4 Plinths 7: Yolunda Hickman's Signal Forest

The Wellington Sculpture Trust is pleased to announce the latest 4 Plinths Sculpture Award is now installed on the Te Papa forecourt.

Yolunda Hickman's work, Signal Forest is a thicket of entangled images on each plinth. Based on stencil motifs, the simplified shapes depict a range of animals, plants, transportation, technology, and cultural items. These shapes are then applied with a pattern or image drawn from the collection and archives of Te Papa Tongarewa, further entangling forms and the boundaries of classification and meaning.

Yolunda Hickman comes from a painting background and her work takes an interest in the contemporary nature of images—how we’re surrounded by them and how we try to deduce meaning. Yolunda has exhibited extensively throughout New Zealand, is a Doctoral candidate at The University of Auckland and a lecturer at Whitecliffe.

The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

With the 4 Plinths Award, the Wellington Sculpture Trust has made a departure from permanent to temporary public art, and showcases New Zealand sculptural practice with biennial sculpture installations. The aim of the project is to foster art, artists and audience interactions, and to provide an opportunity for established and emerging artists to work in the area of large-scale public sculpture.

The Trust acknowledges with warm appreciation its major sponsors, Wellington City Council and the Public Art Fund, as well as the support of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and Seresin Wines.

 

 

 







 

 

 Signal Forest is a thicket of entangled images on each plinth. Based on stencil motifs, the simplified shapes depict a range of animals, plants, transportation, technology, and cultural items. These shapes are then applied with a pattern or image drawn from the collection and archives of Te Papa Tongarewa, further entangling forms and the boundaries of classification and meaning.