News

Friday 6 March is Wellington PARK(ing) Day!

Wellington Sculpture Trust is pleased to announce PARK(ing) Day 2020.

The event will be held on Friday 6 March 2020, with a back-up wet weather date of Friday 13 March. Creatives are preparing to take over a Cuba Street car park between 8am and 6pm. 

PARK(ing) Day is an annual open-source global event where citizens, artists and designers collaborate temporarily to transform metered parking spaces into living parks. The project began in 2005 when Rebar, a San Francisco art and design studio, converted a single parking space into a temporary public park in downtown San Francisco. Since 2005, PARK(ing) Day has evolved into a global movement, with organisations and individuals (operating independently of Rebar, but following an established set of guidelines) creating new forms of temporary public space in urban contexts around the world.

The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate critical debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of the urban human habitat ... at least until the meter runs out!

WST is grateful for continued support from Wellington City Council and Creative Communities.

 

 Wellington Sculpture Trust is pleased to announce PARK(ing) Day 2020. The event will be held on Friday 6 March 2020, with a back-up wet weather date of Friday 13 March. We seek submissions from creatives or groups interested in taking over an inner city car park for this day. WST is grateful for continued support from Wellington City Council and Creative Communities.

PARK(ing) Day is an annual open-source global event where citizens, artists and designers collaborate temporarily to transform metered parking spaces into living parks. The project began in 2005 when Rebar, a San Francisco art and design studio, converted a single parking space into a temporary public park in downtown San Francisco. Since 2005, PARK(ing) Day has evolved into a global movement, with organisations and individuals (operating independently of Rebar, but following an established set of guidelines) creating new forms of temporary public space in urban contexts around the world.

The mission of PARK(ing) Day is to call attention to the need for more urban open space, to generate critical debate around how public space is created and allocated, and to improve the quality of the urban human habitat ... at least until the meter runs out!

Occupation Artist's project 'Detour', awarded Judges' Choice 2019

4 Plinths 7: Yolunda Hickman's Signal Forest

The Wellington Sculpture Trust is pleased to announce the latest 4 Plinths Sculpture Award is now installed on the Te Papa forecourt.

Yolunda Hickman's work, Signal Forest is a thicket of entangled images on each plinth. Based on stencil motifs, the simplified shapes depict a range of animals, plants, transportation, technology, and cultural items. These shapes are then applied with a pattern or image drawn from the collection and archives of Te Papa Tongarewa, further entangling forms and the boundaries of classification and meaning.

Yolunda Hickman comes from a painting background and her work takes an interest in the contemporary nature of images—how we’re surrounded by them and how we try to deduce meaning. Yolunda has exhibited extensively throughout New Zealand, is a Doctoral candidate at The University of Auckland and a lecturer at Whitecliffe.

The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

With the 4 Plinths Award, the Wellington Sculpture Trust has made a departure from permanent to temporary public art, and showcases New Zealand sculptural practice with biennial sculpture installations. The aim of the project is to foster art, artists and audience interactions, and to provide an opportunity for established and emerging artists to work in the area of large-scale public sculpture.

The Trust acknowledges with warm appreciation its major sponsors, Wellington City Council and the Public Art Fund, as well as the support of the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa and Seresin Wines.

 

 

 







 

 

 Signal Forest is a thicket of entangled images on each plinth. Based on stencil motifs, the simplified shapes depict a range of animals, plants, transportation, technology, and cultural items. These shapes are then applied with a pattern or image drawn from the collection and archives of Te Papa Tongarewa, further entangling forms and the boundaries of classification and meaning.